2008 - Research and Writing

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School Choice: Evidence and Recommendations
Date:
March 20, 2008
Editors:
Gary Miron, Western Michigan University
Kevin G. Welner, University of Colorado at Boulder
Patricia H. Hinchey, Pennsylvania State University
Alex Molnar, Arizona State University
School Choice: Evidence and Recommendations, a collection of 10 policy briefs on specific topics under the umbrella of choice, brings together some of the top scholars in the field and presents a comprehensive overview of the best current knowledge of these important policies. Together, the briefs offer reason to believe that choice policies can further some educational goals, but they also offer many reasons for caution.
Report
Available Below
Press Release
Executive Summary
Available in Each Brief
Download individual briefs from this report:
Portable Document Format (PDF)  Introduction
Gary Miron, Western Michigan University
Portable Document Format (PDF)  How Legislation and Litigation Shape School Choice
Julie Mead, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Portable Document Format (PDF)  The Impact of Advocacy Funding on the School Choice Debate
Wendy C. Chi, University of Colorado at Boulder
Portable Document Format (PDF)  School Choice and Accountability
Gregg Garn, University of Oklahoma; Casey Cobb, University of Connecticut
Portable Document Format (PDF)  Funding Formulas, School Choice, and Inherent Incentives
Clive Belfield, Queens College, City University of New York
Portable Document Format (PDF)  Educational Innovation and Diversification in School Choice Plans
Chris Lubienksi, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Portable Document Format (PDF)  School Choice and Segregation by Race, Class, and Achievement
Roslyn Mickelson, Stephanie Southworth, and Martha Bottia, University of North Carolina-Charlotte
Portable Document Format (PDF)  The Competitive Effect of School Choice Policies on Public School Educational Outcomes
David Arsen, Michigan State University; Yongmei Ni, University of Utah
Portable Document Format (PDF)  The Impact of School Choice Reforms on Student Achievement
Gary Miron, Stephanie Evergreen, and Jessica Urschel, Western Michigan University

Charter Ranking Roulette: An Analysis of Reports That Grade States’ Charter School Laws
Date:
February 12, 2008
Authors:
Wendy C. Chi and Kevin G. Welner
Institution:
University of Colorado at Boulder
Since 1996, the Center for Education Reform has released an annual report card, grading each state’s charter school legislation and labeling as the “strongest” those laws placing the fewest and slightest restrictions on charter schools. While the Center for Education Reform rankings have undoubtedly been the most influential, at least four other systems have been developed. In this article, we analyze the different ranking systems, including a new approach we have developed in order to illustrate the arbitrariness of any given ranking system and to highlight some key charter school issues. We then investigate the general, popular phenomenon of rankings in the field of education, exploring the benefits, drawbacks, and appeal of such rankings.
Report
Press Release
Not Available
Executive Summary
Not Available

Promoting ELL Parental Involvement: Challenges in Contested Times
Date:
January 28, 2008
Authors:
M. Beatriz Arias and Milagros Morillo-Campbell
Institution:
Arizona State University
This policy brief analyzes factors related to the implementation of effective parental involvement with English Language Learners (ELLs). It analyzes characteristics of the ELL student and parent population; barriers to ELL family engagement with schools; and characteristics of traditional and non-traditional parental involvement models. Diversity in ELL parents and their communities speaks to the need for both traditional and non-traditional models for ELL parental involvement. With a dual-model approach, variation in language proficiency is acknowledged, communication is facilitated and maintained, and communities are recognized and integrated within the school culture.
Report
Press Release
Executive Summary

Who Chooses Schools, and Why?
Date:
January 7, 2008
Authors:
Natalie Lacireno-Paquet and Charleen Brantley
Institution:
WestEd and University of Massachusetts Boston
This policy brief examines empirical research on the demographic characteristics of students and families who actively engage in school choice as well as the research on the motivations, preferences and behavior of families who actively choose schools. Although there have been many surveys asking parents about their preferences for schools or about what they would choose if they had a choice, such studies are not the focus of this brief. Rather, the research reviewed here is only that which focuses on those who have actively chosen a school. The choice options examined here include home schooling, private schools, vouchers, and public school choice programs such as controlled choice districts, charter schools, and magnet schools.
Report
Press Release
Executive Summary